New book brings history of Hull to Scarborough railway line to life

A new book looking at the history of the Hull to Scarborough railway line is set to be published later this month.

Wednesday, 6th October 2021, 8:28 am
Updated Wednesday, 6th October 2021, 11:58 am
A busy scene in 1956 with 62745, The Hurworth, taking centre stage with a train departing from platform 4. In the shadows, under the original train shed roof, stands a train waiting to depart from platform 2. Photo: R Humm coll.

The publication, written by Keith Smith, covers the line’s hayday when trains were packed with holidaymakers to its current status as a minor line used by commuters.

The book, published by Middleton Press, is the latest in the Country Railway Routes series which also includes a book covering the Hull to Hornsea/Withernsea line.

The hardback book will be available from Saturday, October 23. Its 96 pages contains 120 photographs and large scale maps.

Looking north from Bessingby Road Bridge (A165) on April 23, 1976, a two-car Cravens DMU departs for Hull. Bridlington South signal box (renamed simply ‘Bridlington’ in 1998) is on the left. Photo: D.C. Pearce

A Middleton Press spokesperson said: “Once thronging with holiday traffic, the Hull to Scarborough route is now more aptly described as a ‘minor line’.

“Starting at Hull, it heads north over the East Riding of Yorkshire towards Beverley. From Driffield, it turns back towards the east coast, running up to Scarborough, where it terminates.

“The book, which also covers Filey Holiday Camp Branch, is packed with maps and photographs covering the line’s history over many decades.”

The Filey Holiday Camp station is photographed in July 1977, four months before the station closed. During the 1950s, over half of the 75,000 campers arrived by train. Photo: J.Spencer Gilks/Colour-Rail.com
The publication, written by Keith Smith, covers the line’s hayday when trains were packed with holidaymakers to its current status as a minor line used by commuters.The publication, written by Keith Smith, covers the line’s hayday when trains were packed with holidaymakers to its current status as a minor line used by commuters.