Plans for new lift and platform improvements at Bridlington Train Station

New lifts and alterations to some platforms could be coming to Bridlington Station as the nearest step-free one is currently three miles away.

Thursday, 30th September 2021, 9:54 am
Updated Thursday, 30th September 2021, 9:56 am

Plans from Network Rail submitted to East Riding Council propose building a lift to the station’s footbridge so passengers can reach it without using the existing stairs.

Network Rail also plans to build new columns on Platform Four to support the footbridge, remove gates to it on Platforms Five and Six and replace stair handrails.

The plans come as part of Network Rail’s Accessibility for All scheme, backed by funding from the Department for Transport.

New accessibility improvements could be soon on the way at Bridlington Train Station.

The nearest step-free station to Bridlington is currently at Bempton, around three miles away.

The works would see alterations made to the existing Grade II listed footbridge which Network Rail said would be done “sympathetically” and mean it would not have to be replaced.

Network Rail has also proposed removing the waiting shelter on Platform Four to create an “obstacle free route” to and from trains.

Another building on Platform Four, the only feature of the station which remains from its 1846 opening, would house the lift tower and equipment to keep its “facade and appearance”.

Network Rail want to build a lift to the station’s footbridge and remove gates on some of its platforms.

Plans stated current access at the station for wheelchair users, the disabled and others with reduced mobility was currently “inadequate”.

They added the changes would mean passengers would be able to get to every platform unassisted.

The plans stated: “Current access from the station entrance to Platform Four is only possible via the existing footbridge stairs or via the barrow crossing, supervised by a member of staff.

“The barrow crossing is locked and is reliant upon station staff assistance during staff hours.

“As a result, people with reduced mobility, wheelchair passengers and people with prams and pushchairs struggle to access these platforms.

“We consider this option is the most appropriate for this context and strikes a balance between retaining the overall character of the assets whilst providing modern, step free access.

“The proposal has been carefully designed to minimise the impact the lift structure would have upon the character and appearance of the station whilst causing the least intrusion to the existing canopy and building fabric.

“It is clear that the significance of the site derives from its substantial historical and communal value as an important gateway for tourists to the Yorkshire coast area.”