New data reveals busier summer across the East Riding as footfall in shops increased

Life in the East Riding this summer was much more normal than last year, data suggests, with footfall even surpassing pre-pandemic levels in some categories.

Friday, 8th October 2021, 10:24 am
Activity was 215% above pre-pandemic measurements in parks and public spaces, Google data for July to September in the East Riding shows.

All coronavirus restrictions were lifted in England on July 19, with people allowed back in hospitality venues without needing to socially distance for the first time since March 2020.

Google uses location data from phones and other personal devices to track trends in people’s movement in different parts of their daily lives.

It compares footfall in five areas outside of the home – retail and recreation, supermarkets and pharmacies, parks, public transport and workplaces – to a five-week baseline period recorded before the Covid-19 crisis.

In the East Riding, average activity across these categories was 44% above normal levels between July and September.

This was up significantly from summer 2020, when footfall was 16% above the baseline.

Google data for July to September in the East Riding shows:

○ Activity in retail and recreation establishments was 18% above normal levels

○ In supermarkets and grocery stores, it was 14% above usual

○ Activity was 215% above pre-pandemic measurements in parks and public spaces

○ It was 6% below the baseline on public transport

○ And activity in workplaces was 21% below normal

The British Retail Consortium said its figures show footfall in high streets, retail parks and shopping centres rose from July to August, but was still below normal.

Kyle Monk, director of insights at the BRC, said: “While it is doubtless that the reduction in restrictions and rise in vaccinations have greatly helped footfall regain ground since last year, it remains well below pre-pandemic levels.”

He added retailers are hoping for a further Christmas boost, but that this would “almost certainly fail to materialise” if new Covid restrictions are introduced.