Penny Lane mess leads to a fine of thousands of pounds by court

The councils planning department started to receive complaints that the site was untidy.
The councils planning department started to receive complaints that the site was untidy.

A Burton Fleming man who failed to clear a site of commercial scrap vehicles faces a bill of more than £4,500 after appearing at court.

Andrew Mendham of Wold Newton Road in the village, appeared at Beverley Magistrates’ Court on March 6, where he pleaded guilty to non-compliance with an enforcement notice issued by East Riding of Yorkshire Council in 2006.

There were eight plant vehicles, 11 motor vehicles and building material on the site.

There were eight plant vehicles, 11 motor vehicles and building material on the site.

Mendham had previously been prosecuted by the council in 2008 for the same offence when he failed to clear a site on Penny Lane, Burton Fleming, of plant equipment, scrap and commercial vehicles.

Following that prosecution, the site was cleared but in 2017 the council’s planning department started to receive complaints that the site was again untidy.

A visit by planning enforcement officers revealed there were eight plant vehicles, 11 motor vehicles and building material on the site.

Mendham was informed the use of the Penny Lane site was in breach of the enforcement notice and in order to comply with the notice, the site had to be cleared by January 31, 2018.

As he failed to comply, he was summonsed to Beverley Magistrates’ Court where District Judge Fred Rutherford was told officers had visited the site two days before the court hearing and although Mendham had made an effort to clear the Penny Lane site it was not enough to comply with the enforcement notice.

Mendham was fined £3,500, has to pay costs of £900.45 and a victim surcharge of £170.

Stephen Hunt, head of planning and development management at East Riding of Yorkshire Council, said: “Officers do try to work with land owners wherever possible to try and resolve issues so cases do not have to go to court.

“The council takes breaches of enforcement notices very seriously and will prosecute, if necessary, should landowners fail to comply.