Bald hedgehogs found on same street in Bridlington

Charlie-Brown and Snoopy are two hedgehog brothers discovered on a street in Bridlington, without and spines.
Charlie-Brown and Snoopy are two hedgehog brothers discovered on a street in Bridlington, without and spines.

These two adorable bald brothers were both found on a Bridlington street within days of each other .

The spineless hedgehogs, named Charlie Brown and Snoopy, were discovered days apart after calls from two residents on the same street.

Charlie-Brown and Snoopy are two hedgehog brothers discovered on a street in Bridlington, without and spines. Charlie-Brown and Snoopy are two hedgehog brothers discovered on a street in Bridlington, without and spines.

Charlie-Brown and Snoopy are two hedgehog brothers discovered on a street in Bridlington, without and spines. Charlie-Brown and Snoopy are two hedgehog brothers discovered on a street in Bridlington, without and spines.

Whitby Wildlife Sanctuary took the pair into their protection last summer and what they lack in prickles they make up for in personality.

Alex Farmer, of the sanctuary, said: “They’ve got lovely characters, they’re doing quite well here. We’re all quite pleased with how they’re getting on.”

Hedgehogs normally have around 500 spines covering their bodies for protection and to keep them warm.

But a genetic disorder is believed to have been caused by a zinc deficiency, resulting in the brothers being born bald.

Charlie-Brown and Snoopy are two hedgehog brothers discovered on a street in Bridlington, without and spines.

Charlie-Brown and Snoopy are two hedgehog brothers discovered on a street in Bridlington, without and spines.

Alex added: “There’s not a lot of research but we believe it to be a genetic problem.

“One hedgehog was a surprise but when we had a call about a second in the same area without spines we thought they must be related.”

The sanctuary searched the area in an attempt to find any other siblings but did not find any others.

Another explanation could be alopecia caused by a stressful incident which resulted in them losing their spines and hair on their face, legs and stomach.

The sanctuary has tried feeding them zinc supplements hoping their spines will grow back.

“The few spines that do grow back are very weak and deformed. They should be sharp and solid and as soon as we stop feeding them the zinc supplement they fall out again,” added Alex.

“It means we can’t release the hedgehogs into the wild so they’ll be here to stay.”

During the winter they’re being kept indoors but when spring arrives they will they will be outdoors in a safe environment which will be closely monitored.