Experts to look at how to shape hall’s future

The council wants to develop Sewerby Hall and Gardens  as a regional  heritage tourist attraction
The council wants to develop Sewerby Hall and Gardens as a regional heritage tourist attraction

A team of experts has been brought in to try to look at ways of maximising the potential of one of the Bridlington area’s most popular attractions.

The first set of ideas on how to grow Sewerby Hall and Gardens’ appeal will be presented in the new year.

An East Riding of Yorkshire Council spokesperson said: “Sewerby Hall and Gardens is a much loved and very popular venue, and we are keen to ensure that it continues to enjoy success in the future.

“Therefore, in October 2017, Bowles Green Ltd. consultants were appointed by East Riding of Yorkshire Council to produce a Business Development Option Study which will identify proposals – and the likely costs and timescales – to develop Sewerby Hall and Gardens as a regional heritage tourist attraction. This study will contribute to the council’s decision to create a short, medium and long-term strategy and action plan for the venue.

“Recommendations will be presented by the consultants to council officers at the end of February 2018.

“The project has three main outcomes, which focus on the commercial, learning and tourism aspects of Sewerby Hall and Gardens.

“The project willdeliver a more sustainable site that secures its future as a flagship council asset, while enabling us to maximise learning opportunities through cultural, heritage and scientific engagement with its customers.

“The council considers that the redevelopment of the site is integral to the wider tourism offer that the East Riding, and indeed Bridlington and the coast, has for both residents and visitors.”

There are local concerns, expressed to the Free Press, that following the relocation of the coach park to the clifftops at Limekiln Lane, that the proposals for Sewerby Hall will include a bigger car park which would affect the surrounding conservation area.

But the spokesman said: “Any outcomes from this study will of course be in keeping with the heritage of the site.”

Three years ago, the hall underwent a £2.6million restoration which recreated the look and feel of the house from its glory days in the Edwardian era.

The council spokesperson added: “The refurbishment was an example of the council continually striving to make the most of its cultural, heritage and tourism assets for the benefit of residents, visitors and the Bridlington economy and the ongoing study of further development options aims to continue this programme of improvement.”