Bridlington man’s two and a half hour wait for ambulance

A 95-year-old Bridlington man had to wait two and a half hours for an ambulance after a doctor told him to get to Scarborough Hospital as soon as possible due to a sepsis infection.

Monday, 13th September 2021, 7:15 am
Updated Tuesday, 14th September 2021, 7:31 am
A spokesperson for Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust said during the last few weeks, the urgent and emergency care system has come under increasing and sustained pressure.

John Charles had developed a sepsis-type rash above his left knee and was sent home by the hospital before being recalled on Monday, September 6.

Mr Charles’ daughter Jane Meredith said: “Initially we were told it would take 40 minutes for an ambulance to arrive. We called 999 again and was told the service was operating at critical level.

“It took two and a half hours for an ambulance to arrive.

“We needed the ambulance on the Friday beforehand and paramedics were on the scene within minutes which was fantastic, so quick.

“They took him to Scarborough Hospital after he felt dreadful. He was cold, he looked pale, and his teeth were chattering.

“The hospital dealt with him and sent him back home.

“However, a doctor rang me to say dad’s blood test was showing he had a bug in his blood (sepsis).

“They said can you get him back to hospital ASAP.

“He was weak and could hardly make it to the bathroom and I am not strong enough to lift him into a car so we called the ambulance again. The called handler said it would be 40 minutes maximum.

“When it did not arrive I called back and I was put in a queue for 15 minutes.

“When I did get through they said they operating at a critical level. It was such a big contrast from the response on the Friday night, when they were so quick.”

A spokesperson for Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust said: “We are sorry to learn that concerns have been raised about our response to a gentleman at home in Bridlington who needed conveying to Scarborough Hospital.

“During the last few weeks, the urgent and emergency care system has come under increasing and sustained pressure.

“Our Patient Relations Team would encourage the family to get in touch so we can liaise with them directly about the specific details of our response.

“All our 999 calls are categorised according to the nature of a patient’s illness or injury and those in a life-threatening condition, such as cardiac/respiratory arrest, are always prioritised to ensure they receive our help as quickly as possible.”