Tighe blasts his way round the world’s toughest race challenge

amazing endurance: Steve Tighe pictured at his final training session before he headed to America for the World's Toughest Mudder. Read more about his exploits and see photographs from the event in next week's Free Press.

amazing endurance: Steve Tighe pictured at his final training session before he headed to America for the World's Toughest Mudder. Read more about his exploits and see photographs from the event in next week's Free Press.

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Gym owner and fitness fanatic Steve Tighe secured a top 50 finish in the event described as the ‘world’s toughest race’.

Tighe, who owns Blast Fitness in Bridlington, covered 70 miles in just under 25-and-a-half hours at the World’s Toughest Mudder in new jersey at the weekend.

The exhausting challenge sees incredibly durable athletes try to complete as many five-mile laps of a course packed with gruelling obstacles as they can in one day.

Tighe went round the course 14 times, battling through the pain barrier, to finish in 50th place overall and sixth in his 35-39 age group.

The former Royal Marine said on his Facebook page: “I have never had such a physical or emotional battle in my life. With three laps to go, my right knee and both ankles were shot, hence the time drop, but I just could not give in without hitting 70 miles

“I crossed the finish line in tears which isn’t great when your supposed to be a machine.”

He set off at eight-minute-mile pace, completing his first lap in 40 minutes, but fatigue and injuries inevitably took their toll. He finished his fifth lap after five hours and 35 minutes and passed the 10-lap milestone in 15 hours and 17 minutes.

After that, the pace slowed considerably with lap 13 taking more than two hours and his 14th and final trip round the course been an ordeal which lasted almost six hours.

The 35-year-old’s efforts have raised around £7,000 for Help for Heroes and Yorkshire Cancer Research.

He arrived back in Bridlington on Tuesday and said: “The journey home so far has been worse than the race itself, involving a couple of wheelchair stints but it was worth every step of pain though.”

The winner of the race was Ryan Atkins of Canada who covered 20 laps, or 100 miles, in 23 hours.