Why stoop so low?

Carol Rodgers is fed-up of thieves stealing flowers from her father's memorial bench at Sewerby Cliff Tops. 
NBFP PA1618-2f
Carol Rodgers is fed-up of thieves stealing flowers from her father's memorial bench at Sewerby Cliff Tops. NBFP PA1618-2f

Every time Carol Rodgers leaves flowers at her late father’s bench atop Sewerby Cliffs, she kisses her hand and touches his name plaque.

The 67-year-old had frequently adorned the touching testament to her father, Douglas Wellings, with flowers, plants and decorations in his memory.

Carol's late father, Douglas Wellings

Carol's late father, Douglas Wellings

But that has all stopped following the latest theft from the bench, which is situated at what was one of Douglas’ favourite spots.

“I would like to buy more expensive flowers to leave at the bench, but I know they will just get pinched, so I don’t bother,” said Carol, who lives at Horseshoe Drive in Sewerby.

“But you shouldn’t have to think like that,” she added.

On March 24, the day that would have been her father’s 90th birthday, Carol went to place flowers at the bench in memory of the former railways signal man.

Thornwick Bay by Mavis Hallam.

Thornwick Bay by Mavis Hallam.

But within 24 hours the flowers were gone.

“You just feel sick, it’s like you have been given some bad news. It’s not the first time it’s happened either,” Carol added.

Carol said thieves had previously targeted the bench a number of years ago, and stole 12 flowers that she had specially planted in memory of her dad.

“After that, I left it about six months and got six heathers just in front of the bench on the cliff top,” she added.

“Then I think it was within the week that I had gone down and they had gone.

Carol and her family chose Sewerby Cliffs as it was one of Douglas’ favourite places to sit and look out to sea, before he passed away in 2002.

“He used to spend hours up there,” she added.

The latest theft was especially devastating for her 88-year-old mother, Ethel Wellings, who is housebound following a stroke two years ago and finds it difficult to get out about.

Carol explained: “When I got the flowers, I put them in a bunch and showed them to my mum in a picture.

“The first thing she said was ‘someone will pinch them!’ To her it’s like desecrating a grave. She’s of a generation when people didn’t do these things.”

Sadly, Carol admits there is not much that can be done to dissuade the thieves, so she hasn’t contacted the police.

She also believes pleading with the thieves wold likely only fall on deaf ears.

“I would like to think if it was their parents or relatives, the would have an idea of what you feel.

“But for people who stoop so low then there’s no point in appealing to them because if they can do that, then they must have no conscience.

The Free Press contacted the East Riding Council and Humberside Police but both declined to comment.