Pilot escapes crash landing

John Brompton, who crashlanded his plane in a field between Hunmanby and Hunmanby Grange Farm. Photo by Dave Barry 112596b

John Brompton, who crashlanded his plane in a field between Hunmanby and Hunmanby Grange Farm. Photo by Dave Barry 112596b

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A PILOT from Bridlington walked away without a scratch after he was forced to land his plane in a field.

John Brompton, 62, had just a minute to put down his single-seater light aircraft, after his engine cut out 1,500ft above farmland near Hunmanby.

The light plane which crashlanded in a field between Hunmanby and Hunmanby Grange Farm. Photo by Dave Barry 112596a

The light plane which crashlanded in a field between Hunmanby and Hunmanby Grange Farm. Photo by Dave Barry 112596a

His emergency training kicked in and after making a Mayday call, he put the plane down in a cornfield not far from Wold Top Brewery.

“The landing was surprisingly smooth. I was expecting the plane turn over, but it came to a stop after about 50 yards. I was probably lucky.

“We all train for such an incident but you hope it never happens, when it does it makes you sit up a bit,” said Mr Brompton, who has 45 years of flying experience.

He escaped without so much as a bruise and said his Slingsby Tipsy Nipper T-66 plane seemed undamaged.

It happened just before 2pm on Sunday while Mr Brompton, of Eighth Avenue, Bridlington, was on his way in from Hull Flying Club at Linley Hill, near Beverley to Eddsfield airfield at Octon, where he had planned to drop in for a cup of tea and a bacon sandwich.

A helicopter, the ambulance service, firefighters and police raced to the scene.

“After the forced landing there was no-one there but me and I walked to a farmhouse. On the way I could hear the sirens and came across a walker who was surprised to know where I had come from.

“I then met a paramedic who said he was looking for a crashed aeroplane. I explained it was mine,” said Mr Brompton.

He was given a check over, but did not want to go to hospital,

Mr Brompton has had the light aircraft for about 10 years, firstly as part of a group, until he bought it five years ago after retiring from the RAF.

He now flies for fun two or three times a week.

The engine problem was traced to a failure in a drive belt which drove the fuel pump.

“The engine manufacturers have told me it is a unique failure they have never experienced before,” said Mr Brompton who said his experience had not put him off flying.

His problem now is removing his aircraft from the farm field.

He has reported the incident to the Civil Aviation Authority and been in contact with his insurers.

“I have had lots of offers of help from fellow fliers and I think it may be a question of having to dismantle it, take the wings off, before I can take it away,” he said.