Opinion: The latest technology is also used by crooks

Shielding the numbers while using ATMs may not be enough as crooks can use infrared software.
Shielding the numbers while using ATMs may not be enough as crooks can use infrared software.

Parliament rightly encourages the development of new technology, so year after year new gadgets and gizmos are launched which our ancestors would not have believed possible.

Most of this is a force for good but, as was always the case throughout history, new technology is available to crooks too.

Sir Greg Knight.

Sir Greg Knight.

When you make a purchase on your credit card, you may think you are safe if you shield your PIN from the gazing eye of others, but this may not now always be the case. New infrared software reveals which buttons have just been pressed because they are warmer following contact with your fingers and the device can easily be loaded onto a smart phone.

Thus, shielding the numbers you are pressing on a credit card machine may now not be enough.

To remain secure, the answer is to rest your fingers on other buttons which you are not going to press, as well as those you are, so that fraudsters cannot deduce what numbers are relevant.

Whilst the marvels of new technology will continue to astound us, I remain unimpressed that although mankind is able to put a man on the moon with ease, in East Yorkshire you still cannot talk to someone on a mobile phone without getting cut off!

It is the time of year when many of us buy anti-freeze for our car and some retailers are now supplying anti-freeze which is branded as ‘ready mixed’.

But what actually does it mean?

It means instead of mixing it with tap water at home, you are buying a weaker product and paying to carry home the manufacturer’s own water!

Retailers who suggest that this is a good buy are selling a product which clearly holds more water than their own argument.