‘What idiot would dye a seagull pink?’

Pretty in pink? This seagull chick doesn't seem to think so
Pretty in pink? This seagull chick doesn't seem to think so

Even Bridlington’s seagulls are not safe from the recent craze of dying birds pink after, a rather unhappy-looking chick was spotted struggling to adjust to his new hue.

The pictures were taken by Mael Matthews’ children at Bridlington Harbour on Monday (27 July), who was visiting the resort with his two sons Carrick Matthews, 11 and Maxen Matthews, 13.

Mr Matthews said the bird was struggling to socialise because of his colour

Mr Matthews said the bird was struggling to socialise because of his colour

He said he “could not imagine what sort of idiot” would do such a thing.

“It can’t be good for it,” added Mr Matthews, “my two boys spotted it and took the pictures on their phones. It was just standing there, looking perplexed.

“It was being shunned by the other seagull chicks, standing still, standing alone - it was not happy.”

It comes amid a bizarre national craze which has seen dozens of pink pigeons having also been dyed pink.

The RSPCA said painting birds can be harmful to their health

The RSPCA said painting birds can be harmful to their health

Although many find the practice amusing the RSPCA say the craze is no laughing matter, and may be risking the birds’ lives.

A spokesperson said: “This isn’t funny, it is cruel and unnecessary, and it’s particularly concerning to hear about it happening to a chick. Dyeing a bird could cause allergic reactions and compromise the animal’s ability to communicate with other animals of their own and other species and make them more vulnerable to predators.”

The spokesperson added other factors which worried the charity included that birds could find the painting or spraying process very stressful.

They added: “Some birds will try to clean any substance from their feathers to keep themselves clean. Having an unwanted substance on their feathers could lead them to ingest the dye/paint.

“There is the potential for the dye/paint to be toxic and harm the animals. Although some substances may be labelled as being suitable for human consumption, this does not mean that these substances would therefore be suitable for animals.

“There are many things which humans can eat and drink which are not safe for animals. There is also the potential that people may use other substances for dyeing or painting, which could prove toxic if ingested by an animal.

“Birds are living creatures and dyeing them in this way sends out an extremely worrying message that they could be viewed as novelties rather than as intelligent, sentient beings.”