Letter: Spaces will remain around hotel area

The new hotel at Beaconsfield will have a beneficial spin-off effect on other hotels and guest houses in town.
The new hotel at Beaconsfield will have a beneficial spin-off effect on other hotels and guest houses in town.

I refer to the letter from Mr Colin Cawthray in the Bridlington Free Press, 27 October, and I would like to respond to the two questions as follows.

Firstly I would like to clarify that it is the central section of the Beaconsfield Car Park that has been sold for the development of a hotel and linked restaurant by Premier Inn. The car parking around the perimeter on Carlisle Road, Royal Crescent and Albion Terrace will remain.

The development of a new hotel is important to the economy of Bridlington and to help grow the business at the Spa which will have a beneficial spin-off effect on the other hotels and guest houses in the town.

Parking for the hotel and restaurant will be self contained within its own site.

I can understand why some will take exception to the loss of car parking space in the town but when you consider the town centre as a whole the loss of c140 car parking spaces can be accommodated amongst the other town centre car parks where there is always spare capacity and by increased utilisation of the park and ride facility in the summer season.

Analysis of the council’s data taken from the car park ticket vending system indicates that even at the busiest times the remaining car parks can accommodate the cars that would otherwise have parked in Beaconsfield.

Additionally we are experiencing an increased use of the park and ride facility from South Cliff. During the peak summer season this year the park and ride has operated successfully with increased operating hours and an extended route through to the leisure centre.

It is expected that this will be continued in 2017.

Secondly, when displaced motorists park in the alternative town centre car parks there is still a fee to pay so we would expect that any income lost from Beaconsfield would be compensated for by increased receipts in the alternative location. Also bear in mind that this should actually be more profitable overall since the operating costs of the car parks would reduce with one less to operate, maintain and pay business rates on.

I trust this answers the questions raised by Mr Cawthray.

Alan Menzies
Director of Planning and Economic Regeneration at East Riding Council