Fisherman’s tales give boost to charity

David Brown (centre) and his sister Ann Ferris present �250 to Major William Heiselman of the Sacramento branch of the Salvation Army.
David Brown (centre) and his sister Ann Ferris present �250 to Major William Heiselman of the Sacramento branch of the Salvation Army.

A BRIDLINGTON fisherman who recalled his memories growing up close to the sea in a book has handed over proceeds from its sale to charity.

The book ‘Children of the Sea’, written by David Brown and his elder sister Ann Ferris, told of his experiences as a child living at Number 3 Slipway Cottages, at the foot of Pump Hill.

The pair recently travelled to America, where they presented Major William Heiselman, of the Salvation Army in Sacramento, with a cheque for £150, some of the proceeds from the book’s sale.

The rest of the funds raised will be going to Bridlington RNLI, who were given books by David and Ann to sell with all money going to the charity.

David said he wanted to thank everyone who helped him put the book together, all those who have bought a copy, and those who helped sell it, including Lyndsay Armstrong at Behind the Times on Bridge Street. He also thanked the Free Press for their publicity.

David and Ann are descendants of Christopher (Kit) Brown, whose story is well known in the town. Kit died in 1898, during an attempt to save his son Fred, who was aboard the lifeboat Seagull.

David Brown’s grandfather Frank and father Bernard both lived in the cottage on Pump Hill.

When David was a child in 1957, a high tide flooded the cottage to a depth of six feet; the children were rescued and the cottage was eventually condemned.

The book brings to an end David’s connection with the sea, which in the past has seen characters such as John Brown, who helped rescue Sir John Ross from the Arctic icecap in 1832 after being stuck for over a year in an ice-bound vessel before rescue.